Surviving in the Mist of Failure II

In our article “Surviving in the Mist of Failure I” we discussed the important concept of dealing with the shadows of your failure by adopting a victor mentality rather than a victim mentality. Adopting the victor mentality is important as it helps us to keep our mind focused on the right things so as to move our lives beyond our point failure.

One other important concept in the matter of failure is the temptation to give up our God-given principles that seemed to have led or contributed to our failure. I will like us to discuss this concept under the subtopic- Don’t Get Beaten Down into Giving Up.

Human pressure (pressure from friends, colleagues, parents and spiritual leaders) may be one of the most effective weapons that fights our will to hold on to God-given principles in the face of failure. This pressure becomes even more fatal when it comes from people we have trusted or still trust. But how do we deal with such pressures especially now that we may have “failed” while applying some of our strongly held principles.

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Source: mikeforchrist.files.wordpress.com/2013/06/flickr-man-in-remorse.jpg

Let me share with you three ideas I learnt in the mist of failure;

1: Know from whom you have learnt these things (2 Timothy 3:14): what is the source of your principles, if they are from God and living by them grants you inner peace, keep them. If they are self-made, re-examine them in the face of God’s word; never say never until God says never.

2: Do not take the advice of those who demonstrate little or no understanding of the truths of your situation, unless you have a clear inner witness or direction from God to do so.

3: Do not take the advice of those who base their confidence or argument in fleshly knowledge or convictions (blind physical evidence) or unguarded emotions (anger or excitement). This idea is especially critical when the matter has a spiritual component. Spiritual matters are spiritually discerned (1 Corinthians 2: 13-14). These lessons, I have learnt, also apply to people you trust, you have to discern the times when their advice is not in line with God’s ways.

Surviving in the Midst of Failure I

Failure comes to us one way or another, no matter how hard we work to avoid it. And especially if you are working to live an extraordinary life, even the “smallest” of failures may be to you a gaping gap in the “perfect” life you want to live.

Missed opportunities, failed relationships, speaking the wrong word, accusing or being accused wrongly may be examples of nightmares or daytime horrors that we may not be able to get over. But that may just be the beginning of our horror stories. The worst part of these stories come when we have to live in the “eternity” of the consequences of these failures.

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When you have to unavoidably see eye to eye with the woman you had a painful divorce or broken relationship with on a regular basis, or the boss whose money you lost in an erroneous investment decision that is still haunting the company.

Living with consequences or circumstances that arise out of a failure you have experienced is a constant reminder of the error or sin that led to the consequence and a haunting experience that nobody may be able to understand or bear with you fully. But what should be of outmost importance should be how to survive and thrive in such a situation.

A first step to survival is to overcome the tendency to constantly remind yourself of the error or sin that has opened the door to the many “evils” that may now be tormenting you. Constantly reliving the error or sin in your mind keeps you stack at the level of your failure and makes you a victim of your failure. It also constantly opens up afresh all psychological and emotional wounds that were born by your error or sin and makes you more vulnerable to attack from other psychological and emotional predators such as depression and self-loathing. Wounded animals attract further attacks and that is why as Dr. Mike Murdock encourages, you will need to avoid the victim mentality.

The victim mentality focuses on the error or sin that has generated the circumstances or consequences you are facing while the victor mentality (although admits error or sin and learns from error while confessing and repenting from sin) focuses attention on finding solution to the currents situation and on the sacrifice that Jesus made on the cross which is greater than all sin and by which all sin can be forgiven. The victor mentality focuses on the fact that in ALL things we are more than conquerors through Christ who redeemed us (Romans 8: 37).

Alex Zanardi: An Extraordinary Man

With less than a liter of blood left in his body, Alex Zanardi’s heart stopped seven times and he was read his last rites by a priest on the helicopter ride from the Eurospeedway to the hospital.

Fifteen years on from the day his car and body were severed/cut in two, the former F1 and IndyCar driver enters the history books as a three-time Paracycling gold medalist..

The Italian could have turned away from elite sport forever, but his injuries have been life-threatening as well as life-changing; today, Zanardi considers his appalling accident one of the greatest opportunities of his life.

“Normally I don’t thank God for these type of things as I believe God has more important stuff to worry about, but today is too much, I had to raise my eyes and thank him,” Zanardi told reporters after the race (2016 Paralympics).

“I feel my life is a never-ending privilege.”

Now at 49, the Italian overcame men half his age to take the title, despite originally taking up the sport to keep fit.

A few things to learn from him

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